Local History

PRONI in the shadow of Harland & Wolff cranes

Preparing for a visit to the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI)

Add Your Heading Text Here About PRONI The Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) is located in the Titanic Quarter of Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland in a purpose-built archive.  It is overlooked by Samson and Goliath, the two iconic, yellow-painted gantry cranes of the Harland and Wolff shipyard where the doomed Titanic was […]

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Copy of probate document held in Irish Land Commission records

Irish Land Commission Talks

Irish Land Commission talks I’ll be delivering two talks next week both on the same subject of Irish Land Commission records. This is a greatly under-used resource that can provide us with a great deal of interesting and useful information about our ancestors who sold their land or bought their farms under the various Irish

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The Celtic Year blog post by Roots Revealed

The Celtic Year – the Festival of Samhain, Forerunner of Halloween

Soon it will be Halloween and the shops are filled with pumpkins and costumes for both children and adults to disguise themselves as they get up to mischief. There are apples and nuts for sale along with the bags of sweets to give to the children who call at the door. Some will be planning

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Coat of arms of Mid and East Antrim Borough Council

Film on Industrial Heritage and the Future of Fashion

I really enjoyed researching for this film on the Industrial Heritage and the Future of Fashion in the Mid-Antrim area. The film was commissioned by Mid and East Borough Council and The Braid, Mid-Antrim Museum for the Professor Brian Cox Summer School. It focuses on the history of the linen industry in the area and

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The Celtic Year blog post by Roots Revealed

How Our Irish Ancestors Celebrated Midsummer or St John’s Eve

Introduction In ancient Ireland, the Celtic Year was dominated by four major festivals; Imbolg was the start of the agricultural year on 01 February; Beltane marked the start of summer and was celebrated on 01 May (read more here); Lughnasadh was celebrated in August and marked the harvest and Samhain was celebrated on 31 October

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